Ask yourself a question about Facebook

As you probably know I’ve made some experiments about Facebook in the past. Since then, I’ve completely removed myself from Facebook.

I just keep my profile “shut down” in order to access to some pages and logins I have on other websites. I feel better, I don’t visit it anymore, I don’t share something on my personal Facebook Profile since a while.

Today I would ask you to ask yourself a question about Facebook. Continue reading “Ask yourself a question about Facebook”

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About Bitcoin

Blockchain technologies are here to stay. Wikipedia does a superb work on describing what a blockchain is.

A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.

Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block,[6] a timestamp and transaction data.

By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. A blockchain can serve as “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way.”

Continue reading “About Bitcoin”

Software industry VS “Real world” industry

I was just reading this article about opening a restaurant in Portland, found on Hacker News. Then, this comment happened: I’ve changed it a bit, but it’s almost untouched. Credits at the end.

It’s amazing how much better we Software folks have it when it comes to starting a business.

The profit margins for a single-player SaaS business (like many, out there, check this) can be somewhere around 90%.

And the interesting thing about that isn’t even the number. It’s that SaaS is so profitable that you don’t even have to calculate your margins.

To an order-of magnitude, every dollar a customer pays for the service can be considered profit. Real Businesses, like restaurants, shops, etc… have expensive office or retail space. We have “wherever we happen to be living at the moment” when it comes to software development.

Real Businesses have employee salaries. We have an industry where a single person can plausibly run every aspect of the business from writing the code to marketing to racking servers to high-touch Enterprise sales.

That single “employee” can have his “salary” set to (Total Profit) / 1.

Real Businesses have equipment and other recurring costs. We have those too, but they’re tiny compared to other types of business. Like, single-digit-thousands per year tiny. All in, for servers, software, dev hardware, etc.

It’s almost unfair, how Software wins in pretty much every category against pretty much everything else.

From an Hacker News comment.

The luxury of having secrets

It’s 2017. You barely have any secret anymore. But what’s a secret? Let’s see a definition of the term “secret”:

Something that is kept or meant to be kept unknown or unseen by others.

According to the Oxford Dictionary.

If you think of it, you can’t really find a secret which is not known in some way by Google, Facebook or other big corporations.

Let’s make an example. Continue reading “The luxury of having secrets”

Why programmers should try online poker

Recently I found a new hobby: online texas hold’em. I’m not spending big money on it (I mostly play free tournaments in an italian poker room and a free online game on my iPhone) but I’m finding poker very relaxing and I also find some similarities between online poker and programming, plus something more…

Poker teaches you to be a better programmer…

There’s always someone better than you
You can be the best coder among your friends and colleagues, but you’re not for sure the best developer around. The same happens in poker: you can be the best player in your friends pool, but you’re not the best player in the world.

Remember to code, code, code, exercise and study, try and fail. This is the only way to improve yourself and prove you are the best.

Math is useful
I see a lot of people around telling “I don’t need math”. In poker (and in programming) you need a lot of math, even for simple operations. Maybe you already know that, but pick five minutes to test (and improve) your math skills. You can find some tests and exercises here.

Be fast and precise
In online poker you can’t think hours for your next move. If you are a programmer you should be fast-thinking and precise. Fast and no errors. Simple, isn’t it?

Apply lateral thinking to approach your problem
Sometimes the best solution is just around the corner. Be creative!

If you want to try poker there are a lot of free poker games on Facebook, iPhone, etc… Don’t waste your money. The fun is the same.

P.s.
Online gaming is an hobby, but it could easily ruin your life. If you have problems with gaming & gambling visit this site.