This is the kind of automation I like…

Heckel’s bot farm is not a complex operation. He uses the Raspberry Pi to run a script that checks his and his clients’ accounts every few seconds. When the script sees a new post, it logs into each of the 2,900 accounts it controls and uses them to like it. The script can automate up to three likes per second. It pulls the bots’ usernames and passwords from a spreadsheet Heckel bought access to on Telegram’s Black Market group for approximately $1,600 last year. For Heckel, the bot and Fuelgram come together masterfully. In April alone, he’s used them to make $12,000.

People are turning their accounts into bots on Instagram.

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What I did this year: 2017 edition

So, I did a lot of things this year, here’s a complete list of stuff done I’ve update during the last 12 months!

5 BOOKS WORTH READ (or re-read)

SIDEPROJECTS LAUNCHED: 4

PLACES I’VE BEEN FOR MORE THAN A NIGHT:

  • Home. A lot 😛
  • Varazze, SV, Italy
  • Alassio, SV, Italy
  • San Francisco (and Silicon Valley), California, USA
  • Napoli, NA, Italy
  • Modena, Maranello, Predappio, MO/BO, Italy
  • Monopoli, BA, Italy
  • Bologna, BO, Italy
  • Wien (Vienna for friends), Austria

Diagnosing the Italian disease

Italy stands out among developed countries for its large public debt and chronically low productivity growth.

The country’s productivity growth disease cannot be addressed without understanding why aggregate labour productivity abruptly stopped growing around 1995.

This column argues that the most likely cause is Italian firms’ non-meritocratic managerial practices, which meant they failed to capitalise on the ICT revolution.

Diagnosing the Italian disease

Ask yourself a question about Facebook

As you probably know I’ve made some experiments about Facebook in the past. Since then, I’ve completely removed myself from Facebook.

I just keep my profile “shut down” in order to access to some pages and logins I have on other websites. I feel better, I don’t visit it anymore, I don’t share something on my personal Facebook profile since a while.

Today I would ask you to ask yourself a question about Facebook. Continue reading “Ask yourself a question about Facebook”

About Bitcoin

Blockchain technologies are here to stay. Wikipedia does a superb work on describing what a blockchain is.

A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.

Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block, a timestamp and transaction data.

By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. A blockchain can serve as “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way.”

Continue reading “About Bitcoin”

Software industry VS “Real world” industry

I was just reading this article about opening a restaurant in Portland, found on Hacker News. Then, this comment happened: I’ve changed it a bit, but it’s almost untouched. Credits at the end.

It’s amazing how much better we Software folks have it when it comes to starting a business.

The profit margins for a single-player SaaS business (like many, out there, check this) can be somewhere around 90%.

And the interesting thing about that isn’t even the number. It’s that SaaS is so profitable that you don’t even have to calculate your margins.

To an order-of magnitude, every dollar a customer pays for the service can be considered profit. Real Businesses, like restaurants, shops, etc… have expensive office or retail space. We have “wherever we happen to be living at the moment” when it comes to software development.

Real Businesses have employee salaries. We have an industry where a single person can plausibly run every aspect of the business from writing the code to marketing to racking servers to high-touch Enterprise sales.

That single “employee” can have his “salary” set to (Total Profit) / 1.

Real Businesses have equipment and other recurring costs. We have those too, but they’re tiny compared to other types of business. Like, single-digit-thousands per year tiny. All in, for servers, software, dev hardware, etc.

It’s almost unfair, how Software wins in pretty much every category against pretty much everything else.

From an Hacker News comment.